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    [PB] Торстен Калка - Художник 3D / Thorsten Kalka

    Thorsten Kalka - 2008 - Анкета / Fragebogen - 2008


    [Bild: f0f76626038e4e1d02c885caf2853061.jpg]

    Имя

    Торстен Калка

    Твоя работа в Пиранья Байтс

    Художник 3D

    Возраст

    32

    Образование

    техник-геодезист (с 1999 г. больше этим не занимаюсь )

    Кем работал раньше?

    техник-геодезист / 3D художник

    В каких игровых проектах участвовал?

    Die Sternenfahrer von Catan / Tommy Tiger / Sldner / The Show / Gothic 3

    Любимая музыка?

    Все подряд: Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nelly Furtado, The Darkness, Police, и т.д...

    Любимая игра?

    Так сразу сложно сказать, например, Rayman, Shenmue, Dune 2000, Vampire, Call of Duty etc.

    В чем ты особенно силен?

    Никогда не сдаюсь.

    Что ты терпеть не можешь?

    Несправедливость.

    Чем ты увлекаешься, какие у тебя хобби?


    Гитара, азартные игры, рисование, иногда также спорт...

    Что бы ты хотел увидеть однажды в игре?

    Nelly Furtado в роли Tomb Raider.

    Боишься ли ты, что когда-нибудь твои идеи для игры могут иссякнуть?

    Нет!

    World of Risen


    С остальными анкетами Пираний вы можете ознакомиться - ЗДЕСЬ

    [Bild: odin_md_akcr.jpg]
    ASUS LGA-1150 Z97-K, Intel Core i7-4770 3.4 GHz, EVGA GTX 980 Ti Hybrid ( 6.0 Gb), 16Gb DDR3, SSD OSZ Vertex 460A (240 Gb) + SSD Samsung SM951 M.2 (256 Gb), Dell Ultrasharp U2515H (2560 x 1440) + BenQ E2400HD (1920x1080)

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    Новость из фейсбука

    Thorsten Kalka
    26 апреля в 13:31
    unser Blog wchst
    fr die Gamer unter euch vielleicht
    ist das ein oder andere ja interessant

    Character Texturing Workflow - Masters Game
    When building a character for a game or any kind of realtime environment, there are many things to keep in mind. A while back we mentioned some pitfalls to avoid during the modeling stage, today well talk a bit about UV mapping and texture painting.
    MASTERS-GAME.COM


    APRIL 26, 2017
    Character Texturing Workflow
    in Workflow



    When building a character for a game or any kind of realtime environment, there are many things to keep in mind. A while back we mentioned some pitfalls to avoid during the modeling stage, today well talk a bit about UV mapping and texture painting.
    UV mapping is a rather tedious process, but its a requirement because it prepares the canvas for you to paint on. If you do a sloppy job, it will bite you later. Your textures may end up looking stretched, blurry or glitchy. It doesnt matter which program you use to do the UV mapping as long as you end up with a clean layout in the end.
    Our character artist Thorsten typically uses Maya, and he starts off by applying an automatic mapping for various segments of the character. Afterwards he stitches these UV segments together into logical islands, such as hands. Although this is a lot of work, it pays off because the resulting UV layout contains very few islands. In contrast, using an entirely automatic UV mapping would create lots of small islands with seams all over the place. Making tweaks to that kind of layout is a nightmare, so we dont recommend the automatic method.


    Speaking of seams, you should place them in areas where the player cant see them easily or in the case of clothing where they might naturally occur. Beginners should never flip UV shells since this can cause problems with the normal map once inside the game engine. Its possible to fix such problems afterwards, but its best to avoid them from the start.
    While doing your UV layout, always use checkermaps to verify that the size of your UVs is about the same everywhere. This way you end up with uniform and evenly distributed texture resolution.
    When your lowpoly mesh and the UV layout are done, you can start sculpting a higher resolution mesh. Once again, there are many software options for this, so use the one that youre comfortable with. We like ZBrush because it offers excellent performance even when working with very detailed geometry.


    By the way, you can also do these steps in reverse order and start with a highpoly mesh directly in ZBrush. You would sculpt all the detail you need and then retopologize this into a lowpoly version. Were old school though and prefer to start with a hand-modeled lowpoly base mesh. Once the high-detail sculpt is done, you can render out a normal map.
    The normal map is used to give the illusion of high-detail geometry on a lowpoly mesh. You may also want to output an ambient occlusion map and a displacement map. These can be helpful in the texture painting stage.


    Back in the old days, Photoshop was the number one tool for painting textures, and its still a great pick. However, theres a new kid in town, and its become really popular really quickly. The application is called Substance Painter, it lets you paint your textures directly onto your 3D model with live feedback on how the materials look like. We enjoy working with it because its easy to use and speeds up our workflow considerably.
    This blog entry has gotten rather technical and long, so well end it here for now. Feel free to experiment with the various tools out there and pick the ones that suit your needs best.

    [Bild: odin_md_akcr.jpg]
    ASUS LGA-1150 Z97-K, Intel Core i7-4770 3.4 GHz, EVGA GTX 980 Ti Hybrid ( 6.0 Gb), 16Gb DDR3, SSD OSZ Vertex 460A (240 Gb) + SSD Samsung SM951 M.2 (256 Gb), Dell Ultrasharp U2515H (2560 x 1440) + BenQ E2400HD (1920x1080)

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    MAY 3, 2017
    Headless No More
    in Design, Workflow

    [Bild: Head_Tex.jpg]

    Last week we showed you various texturing stages of our villain. He was missing the head then, so lets take another look.
    The head and face are prominent areas of every character, therefore special attention and care must be taken when preparing UVs and painting textures. We typically spend more time on it than we do for example on a piece of clothing. However, in terms of overall workflow the head texturing process is no different from what we described previously. We start with a lowpoly mesh, sculpt it and paint it.

    [Bild: Head_Perspective.jpg]

    When it comes to faces, the cameras field of view makes quite a difference. Setting up a large field of view results in lots of perspective, which optically widens facial features and makes them more prominent. A smaller field of view on the other hand flattens the face. It often makes sense to match the camera settings in the sculpting / texturing application to the game engines camera.

    [Bild: Head_UV.jpg]

    A clean single-island UV layout is helpful if the face is to be textured using photographs. This is how we used to do it in the past, but ever since we discovered Substance Painter we prefer to paint head textures by hand. The application provides a lot of good tools to create believable skin.

    [Bild: Head_Hair.jpg]

    Our villain character has already moved on into the rigging and animation stage, but of course he is still missing hair. We are currently trying out various methods of getting decent hair into Unity. This is a tricky subject, and we will discuss it in more detail in a later blog post. For now heres a quick sneak peek of some highres hair style we prepared. It remains to be seen how much detail we can get into the actual game.

    [Bild: odin_md_akcr.jpg]
    ASUS LGA-1150 Z97-K, Intel Core i7-4770 3.4 GHz, EVGA GTX 980 Ti Hybrid ( 6.0 Gb), 16Gb DDR3, SSD OSZ Vertex 460A (240 Gb) + SSD Samsung SM951 M.2 (256 Gb), Dell Ultrasharp U2515H (2560 x 1440) + BenQ E2400HD (1920x1080)

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    MAY 29, 2017
    Things Are Getting Hairy

    in Design, Development, Workflow

    Источник

    [Bild: Masters_Hair_01.jpg]

    Maybe youve previously seen some cool Nvidia demos with awesome looking hair and wondered why hair in games never matches this quality. To put it briefly, games have a whole lot more processing to do than just character hair. Tech demos typically focus on a single feature and throw a computers entire processing power at it.
    Of course we dont have the luxury to do that, hair is only a tiny tiny part of what makes up our game. For performance reasons we cant do tech demo quality, but we still want the results to look decent because hair is a key visual component of most characters.

    [Bild: Masters_Hair_02.jpg]

    The standard way to do hair in games is to use a number of polygonal strips and map them with hair textures. This puts much less of a strain on the game engine than letting it calculate thousands of individual hair strands.
    For Masters, we have developed a procedural workflow that allows us to easily iterate on hair styles. We use SideFX Houdini to do hair modeling, processing and rendering because it gives us tremendous control and gets hair into Unity quickly.
    We first model a high resolution hair style using Houdinis standard hair tools. Afterwards, our custom asset generates around 400 polygon strips that roughly follow the hair and the shape of the head. A texture baking node then renders the high resolution hair onto the polygon patches.
    We can output many different types of texture maps, such as color, normals, occlusion, displacement and so on. These texture maps are used to control shader parameters inside of Unity where we tweak the final look.

    [Bild: Masters_Hair_03.jpg]

    The remainder of this post gets quite technical as we take a more in-depth look at what we described above. If you want to skip this section, theres a video at the end of the article!
    Modeling the high resolution hair is straightforward. We generate around 2,000 guide hairs and shape them the way we want them with standard tools. The full hair style consists of 40,000 strands which are scattered around the guides. Both the guide hairs and the high resolution hairs serve as an input to our custom Houdini-to-Unity asset.
    We take the guide hairs as a starting point for the realtime version, then strategically delete 80% of them so that were left with about 400 evenly distributed hair curves. From there, we calculate reasonable normals and upvectors in order to extrude the curves sideways and turn them into polygonal strips. We use the head mesh as a target for our upvectors, so that the polygon strips orient themselves towards the head.

    [Bild: Masters_Hair_04.jpg]

    In order not to waste any UV space later, we also calculate an individual width for each strip. We do this by first assigning each of the 40,000 high resolution hairs to its nearest polygon strip. Afterwards, we calculate the widest diameter of each hair bundle, and that diameter serves as a multiplier for the final strips width.
    In the case of our villain character, the widest strip ended up being 4.5 centimeters (1.77″) while the thinnest strip is only 0.3 centimeters (0.12″) wide. UV space optimization succeeded! The UV layout itself is generated by two standard Houdini nodes that pack the map densely.

    [Bild: Masters_Hair_05.jpg]

    At this point were nearly ready to render the textures. Unfortunately, with all polygon strips positioned on the head, theres no reasonable way to render the entire texture map at once. Render rays would hit all sorts of overlapping details, and the results would be subpar.
    Initially we solved the problem by rendering each polygon strip individually and merging them into a single map in post. Although we wrote scripts to facilitate this process, it proved to be too cumbersome and time consuming.
    Instead, we came up with another solution. Our asset now repositions and rotates the polygon patches and their assigned high resolution hairs into a grid-like structure. This does not modify the UVs at all, it only transforms the geometry in world space. By orienting all strips in roughly the same direction, we avoid intersecting rays and can render the entire texture map in a single go.

    [Bild: Masters_Hair_06.jpg]

    Together with the rest of our procedural setup, we can now modify the original hair style at any time without worrying about what happens downstream. Everything we explained is calculated automatically without any manual labor involved. When were ready to go back into Unity, we push a button to let Houdini recook all nodes and re-render the texture maps.
    Once rendering is finished, we can immediately refresh Unity and take a look at the realtime version of the newly modified hair style. Of course its also easy to upres or downres the realtime hair style. Right now it clocks in at around 2,500 polygons total, and going higher or lower is simply a matter of changing a parameter on the asset.
    Regarding the shader setup inside of Unity, were not doing anything fancy. We currently only use two different maps, a diffuse map and a flow map. The flow map describes in which direction the individual hair strands flow within the UV space, this helps give more realistic highlights on the shaded hair.
    To wrap up this excessively long article, heres a short video that showcases the realtime hair in motion and gives a quick summary of our setup process.
    [Video]

    [Bild: odin_md_akcr.jpg]
    ASUS LGA-1150 Z97-K, Intel Core i7-4770 3.4 GHz, EVGA GTX 980 Ti Hybrid ( 6.0 Gb), 16Gb DDR3, SSD OSZ Vertex 460A (240 Gb) + SSD Samsung SM951 M.2 (256 Gb), Dell Ultrasharp U2515H (2560 x 1440) + BenQ E2400HD (1920x1080)

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    JUNE 5, 2017
    When Van Damme is Needed

    in Development, Workflow

    Источник

    [Bild: Masters_Rigging_03.jpg]

    Our character workflow series continues as we dive right into rigging and skinning. We mentioned previously that its important to leave some room between the various geometry elements in order to avoid interpenetration. In the case of our character this proved to be important indeed as you will see in a moment. Of course these gaps shouldnt be too big either, or else things will start looking unnatural.
    We used Mayas HumanIK to quickly generate a default rig. Requirements for a character will often differ from what the default rig provides, but nonetheless its a great starting point and can be extended or modified easily. For instance, we added fingers to the rig because we need decent hand animation for all of our spell-casting characters.

    [Bild: Masters_Rigging_02.jpg]

    Its advisable to model the character in a standard T-pose or whichever other pose is best suited for your bones setup. Then you can select the character geometry and let HumanIK calculate the rig for you. Its important that the Definition section of the rig displays everything in green, that way you know youre good to go. If there are any issues at this stage, you will have difficulty transferring the animation in Unity later on.
    With regards to skinning, things have certainly gotten a lot better over the last 15 to 20 years. Mayas Bind Skin feature does a decent job at distributing bone weights across your characters geometry. Still, decent is not perfect, so manual cleanup cant be avoided.
    To identify problem areas, we like to put the character in a Van Damme or a Matrix pose. Its very unlikely that the character will ever hit such extreme angles in the game, but if we can get all deformation to look clean in those poses, they will also look clean during all other types of animation we may throw at the rig.

    [Bild: Masters_Rigging_01.jpg]

    After putting the Paint Skin Weights tool to good use and ensuring that our villain can do the splits without spazzing out, hes ready for Unity. We simulate the coat in realtime, its not controlled by the bones animation, and if youre curious what the end result of all this work looks like, we have an in-engine video coming up for you very soon.

    [Bild: odin_md_akcr.jpg]
    ASUS LGA-1150 Z97-K, Intel Core i7-4770 3.4 GHz, EVGA GTX 980 Ti Hybrid ( 6.0 Gb), 16Gb DDR3, SSD OSZ Vertex 460A (240 Gb) + SSD Samsung SM951 M.2 (256 Gb), Dell Ultrasharp U2515H (2560 x 1440) + BenQ E2400HD (1920x1080)

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